Body Building – Shoulders/Cardio – Day 53

Day 53

women_upper-body

Wow. Jaime Eason has a beautiful pair of arms. There is nothing “manly” about those. I don’t think I want to go quite that big, but I love the definition and curves. Totally sexy, totally feminine and beautifully proportioned. It still amazes me that you can build or reduce muscles any where on your body and shape it like a piece of clay. It’s not easy, but it’s within your reach. It’s not something you can buy, it’s not something that can be given to you, it’s something you have to work for. Lift heavy for best results, but don’t over do it and injure yourself. Don’t follow the weight I have listed in my routine. You should be figuring out your own personal challenges and logging your own weight.

How do you figure out how much to lift? Typically, if you lift 60%-80% of max, you could do anywhere from 10-20 reps. Lifting at 80% and above takes you down to the lower rep range, which is where you’ll be if you’re trying to gain size. That means keeping your reps somewhere between 8-16, if you’re lifting for weight loss and fitness. Your weights are determined by the number of reps you’re doing.

For Beginners:

  • Choose a weight you can only lift 16 times. You don’t need to go to complete failure, but make sure you’re challenging your body.
  • Begin with 1 set of each exercise, slowly working your way up to 2-3 sets (i.e., adding a set each week)
  • When you’ve added sets and have a solid foundation (after 6-8 weeks), add more weight so that you can ONLY do 8-12 reps.
  • Continue to progress by adding a rep each week until you reach the max reps (no more than 16), increase your weight and drop your reps back down to 8-12.

Before you train your shoulders, it’s important to understand the muscles you’re targeting. Your shoulders are composed of the larger deltoid muscles—anterior, medial, posterior—and smaller rotator cuff muscles that support the ball and socket joint. The rotator cuff is made up of four muscles—the teres minor, infraspinatus, supraspinatus, and subscapularis—which help in all overhead and rotational movements at the shoulder.

The deltoid muscles are the prime mover of arm abduction—moving the arm away from the body.. The front (anterior) muscles are involved in shoulder abduction when the shoulder is externally rotated—think lateral raises with your thumbs turned up. The anterior deltoid also works with the subscapularis, pectorals, and lats to internally rotate the humerus bone, effectively turning your thumbs in and towards the center of the body so your palms face back.

The rear (posterior) fibers are strongly involved in transverse extension, as in cable back rows. The lateral fibers perform basic shoulder abduction when the shoulder is internally rotated, like in lateral raises. They also perform shoulder transverse abduction, as in a reverse fly, when the shoulder is externally rotated. An important function of the deltoid muscles is also to support the humeral head to prevent dislocation when carrying very heavy loads.

Summer Shoulders 

Arnold dumbbell press: 20 lbs. – 4 sets of 8 reps

Seated bent over rear delt raise: 12.5 lbs. – 4 sets of 8 reps, last set to failure

Alternating single-arm dumbbell press: 20 lbs. – 4 sets of 8 reps

Superset:
Front dumbbell raises: 15 lbs. – 4 sets of 8 reps
Upright rows: 20 lbs. – 4 sets of 8 reps
End of Superset

Side lateral raises: 12.5 lbs. – 4 sets of 8 reps, last set is a drop-set

Reverse flyes: 4 sets of 8 reps – Still can’t do these without my rotator giving me hell. I did one rep with 10 lbs., disappointed. Maybe I should drop to 7.5 lbs. and try that next time instead of not doing them at all.

Cardio: 30 minutes medium intensity cardio (running, elliptical, step-mill, etc)

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